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Champlain's A year later Champlain returned to Que-Return, 1633 bec with a number of fresh settlers sent out by the Hundred Associates. He was received with the greatest joy. His first task was to regain the goodwill of the Indians, for upon their friendship depended the success of the fur trade, which was still the life of the colony. With this object he attended many feasts and councils, some of which lasted for several days. In the following summer five hundred Hurons came down to Quebec, bringing a hundred and fifty canoes laden with furs. They were followed by Indians of other tribes. Trade was good, and many colonists were attracted to Canada.

His Last   Champlain now gave much of his time to

Days. religious duties. Life at Fort St. Louis, where the black-robed Jesuits were always welcome, was very quiet and orderly. But as much could not be said for the out-lying posts. The traders, who themselves drank too much brandy, gave the Indians " fire-water " for their furs, and soon they liked this payment better than any other. Champlain and the missionaries set their faces against this wicked way of trading, but they could not put it down. The raids of the Iroquois also caused anxiety, and Champlain was planning another attack on them when he was struck by paralysis, and, after lingering for ten weeks. died on Christmas Day, 1635. His death caused general mourning in Quebec, and he well deserved the love and honour of his people..-

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