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IS   CANADIAN HISTORY FOR BOYS AND GIRLS.

invited to join the company, but if any dared to trade on
their own account, their ships were seized or driven away.
After exploring the Bay of Fundy, De

St. Croix.

Monts set his men to make a garden and

to build houses and a chapel on a little cedar-covered island at the mouth of the River St. Croix, which takes its name from that given to the settlement. As winter came on it appeared that the post had not been wisely chosen. On the island there was neither wood to

burn nor water to drink, and in stormy weather it was often impossible to cross to the mainland. During the

winter nearly half the settlers died, and many of the rest suffered terribly from a painful disease called scurvy..

In the spring forty new

Port Royal.

settlers arrived, and De Monts moved to Port Royal, a beautiful spot which he had granted to Baron de Poutrincourt. The new buildings were scarcely well begun when De Monts was obliged to return to France, but in the following year he sent out a number of labourers and skilled workmen. Port Royal was

healthier than St. Croix, and the GENTLEMAN, 1600.

winter passed cheerfully. Amongst the company was a lawyer from Paris, named Marc Lescarbot, who, in his

ISLE ST. CROI%.
(From Champlain's drawing.)

A FRENCH

Picture
Picture
Picture

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