Previous Index

 

iio   AFTER THE BATTLE

agreeable manners and vivacious spirit of the Canadian ladies :

"It is very surprising," he says, "with what ease the gaiety of their tempers enables them to bear misfortunes which to us would be in-supportable. Families whom the calamities of war have reduced from the height of luxury to the want of common necessities, laugh, dance, and sing, comforting themselves with this reflection — Fortune de guerre 1 Their young ladies take the utmost pains to teach our officers French, with what view I know not, if it is not that they may hear themselves praised, flattered, and courted without loss of time."

It cannot be denied, however, that the suffering among the troops was terrible. Without proper clothing or shelter, and unaccustomed to the severity of the climate, their condition during the succeeding months was deplorable. Food was scarce, blankets still more so, and the only fuel (wood) had to be hewn in the surrounding forest by detachments of troops, in spite of the continual danger from prowling savages. Owing to the scarcity of beasts of burden, the logs in large quantities were removed to town by men harnessed in teams to the traineaux, and, especially before becoming inured to the


Previous Index