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AFTER THE BATTLE   107

whelmed with addresses on our victories ; he will have enough to paper his palace."

Great Britain blazed with illuminations and bonfires, but in one house all was dark and silent; for here the widowed mother of the great general mourned her loving and only son.

The squadron remained in the basin of Quebec as long as the weather permitted, then departed, with the exception of the Racehorse and a companion frigate, bearing with it the remains of the beloved general. The half-demolished town and its garrison were left to the brilliant skies and bitter cold of the long winter. All the churches, convents, and public buildings were almost battered to pieces, and the hastily repaired dwelling-houses could scarcely be made habitable. An officer of note, quartered in a small stable, with hay-loft above, rack and manger, and a well-supplied stove, congratulated himself on his lot. The lower town was but a mass of crumbling ruins. The shells that had gone through the roof of the Recollect Church, had shattered the pavement, throwing up the skulls and bones of those long dead from the graves beneath ; and from every point of view the scene was one of desolation. Writing to


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