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96   THE FALL OF QUEBEC

ing over the St. Charles bridge in the direction of the Heights. On they came round the north ramparts, and through the steep narrow streets. The French regulars, La Sarre, Languedoc, Royal Rousillon, Guienne, Bearn, victors on many a well-fought field, swelled the throng, with hordes of irregulars keen for the fray, and shortly, no doubt, de Bougainville's command from Cap Rouge would appear, catching the enemy in a vice. Already Indians and coureurs under cover all round the field were attacking with spirit, picking off their men with the accuracy of long practice. Wolfe was everywhere, encouraging, arranging, in the enthusiasm of having accomplished something at last. Montcalm spurred backwards and forwards on his black charger. Officers galloped up and down the field, or ran hither and thither with orders. One six-pounder had been brought up the Anse du Foulon with incredible trouble, but none had arrived from Beauport, where, no doubt, every possible defence was reserved to protect the Lower Town ; and though Mont-calm urged de Ramezay for guns, only three field-pieces could be spared from the ramparts. With the rain falling in intermittent showers the lines faced each other.


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