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92   THE FALL OF QUEBEC

It was now early September, and already rumours of the enemy's withdrawal floated through the French ranks—rumours that their rapid succeeding movements seemed to confirm. The camp at Montmorency was abandoned, and every night saw the arrival of more men above the Citadel, where the fleet also was constantly receiving additions. The ships, now hidden by the projection of Cape Diamond from Montcalm, were kept in continual motion, and the patience of de Bougainville and his men, under orders to keep them in sight, was worn out marching back and forth along the plateau. Every night the troops on board ship took to the boats and pulled up the stream, occasionally making well-feigned but unsuccessful attempts to land. The movements, at first incongruous and perplexing, ceased to interest. Vigilance on the plateau began to be relaxed.

The eventful night to which operations had been tending arrived. It was the i2th of September. Wolfe's orders, perfect in detail, were posted on every ship. A cheerful spirit pervaded the ranks. Attack was imminent, but few knew the real point. Two lanterns in the maintop of the Sutherland was to be the signal.

Miles away, in the basin of Quebec, Admiral


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