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THE FALL OF QUEBEC   91

vast natural strength of the position, he drew little comfort from his surroundings. Letters to the Prime Minister had already stated his unexpected difficulties, and he had not scrupled to call it "the strongest country perhaps in the world," but failure, even yet, could not be contemplated. Every part of the narrow beach with its crags towering overhead had been personally examined for the opening that would not disclose itself. Perhaps as near despair as one of his nature could be, Wolfe, examining the cliff from the south shore with his glass for the hundredth time, became aware of a barely indicated line, narrow and almost shrouded in overhanging bushes, which had hitherto escaped his notice. At the summit stood a group of tents. It could not be mere coincidence. He became convinced that there an opening of some kind existed.

Filled with renewed hope and energy, the general made more detailed examination, and discovered the dry, almost precipitous course of the Anse du Foulon, or Fuller's Creek, and with it the floating chimera of his brain began to take shape. Here was his chance at last—and on the successful scaling of this cliff hinged the loss or gain of Canada.


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