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go   THE FALL OF QUEBEC

confident at the time, was beginning to mock him like a will-o'-the-wisp. Montcalm, keeping his own counsel, began to hope that winter would drive the enemy from the field.

In the latter part of July, however, an event sufficiently startling to the garrison took place. With a good wind, and protected from Point Levi, the ship Sutherland one night made a dash past the town, and was soon out of range. From that time whenever opportunity occurred others joined her, and the disquieting fact became known that the English had dragged their heavy boats across the opposite point, and launched them above the narrows. The movements were followed with distrust, but were absolutely unintelligible to the French. Even Montcalm, with the exception of placing de Bougainville with a detachment at Cap Rouge, some miles above the town, and a few troops to patrol the top of the cliff, seemed to have no great anxiety. The precipice stretching above Cape Diamond was held to be even more in-accessible than elsewhere.

At this time Wolfe himself seems to have been quite unable to fathom the future. Stung with the baffling monotony of the campaign, and the ability of his opponent, along with the


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