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THE FALL OF QUEBEC   89

 

 

hundred and fifty feet to join the St. Lawrence. From this position a considerable amount of fighting took place, in which the batteries played their part, but more still fell to the sanguinary lot of the light infantry, rangers, and Indians, who kept matters lively some miles to the rear of the camps, where a ford enabled them to cross and re-cross the river. Sometimes, as day succeeded day, the regulars took part in these forest encounters, and the Indians declared that they were learning how to fight. True it was that they were gaining in-sight into many strange practices. The Canadian coureurs-du-bois, barely recognisable in stains, bedaubed with brilliant-coloured paint, and ornamented with feathers, personated their naked allies, and both sides became expert in the hideous custom of scalping, until Wolfe ordered his men to desist, "except when the enemy are Indians, or Canadians dressed like Indians."

Quebec was fast becoming a ruin, but with the approach of autumn Wolfe seemed no nearer his object than at first. Under a flag of truce it had once been said to him : "You will demolish the town no doubt, but you will never get inside of it ; " and his reply, "I will have Quebec if I stay till November,"

K


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