Previous Index Next

 

88   THE FALL OF QUEBEC

Bourlamaque at Ticonderoga, almost at the same moment.

The first brush between the forces took place a few days later, when Wolfe seized Point Levi opposite, and prepared to place some batteries with which to shell the town. It was a good position, the river at this point being scarcely a mile wide ; and though the guns of the Citadel opened on them and skirmishing parties of French and Indians from the adjacent woods gave some trouble, the batteries were soon ready. From that time every day added to the growing destruction of the town. The terrified townspeople retreated to shelter, and robbers plundered the battered ruins at their leisure—yet the general on the heights was not to be drawn from his ambush.

Wolfe's next move was to bombard the heights of Beauport from the water ; but here again fortune was against him, and the loss sustained very grave. To withdraw his camp from Orleans followed, and, climbing the steep bank, he entrenched himself on the east side of the Montmorency, where he was level with the enemy and at close quarters. Between rolled the narrow black flood with its terrific current, that from the edge in one leap took the two


Previous Index Next