Previous Index Next

 

THE FALL OF QUEBEC   85

view, compelled to steer for the detested invaders. Before the end of the month the leaders were in sight, and soon the channel below the island of Orleans was alive with vessels riding at anchor, while the troops, long imprisoned between decks, gladly felt land again beneath their feet.

From the western point of the island General Wolfe had his first view of the work he had in hand, and it was startling. Neither sketch nor plan, whose minutest detail he had by heart, could outline the massive strength of that grey rock clad in the lovely garb of summer. The narrow streets of the old stone town nestled about her foot and climbed her weathered sides, while grinning batteries of guns looked down menacingly from every elevation, and in the distance stood the heights of Cape Diamond, capped with its defences. To his right, as he turned to survey it, lay the French camp, its fair expanse covering the high-pitched shore for eight or nine miles in the direction of the Montmorency Falls, its protected position seemingly unattainable.

Two or three days passed without action on the part of the enemy, but the governor, against Montcalm's judgment, was determined not to


Previous Index Next