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8o   THE FALL OF QUEBEC

tion upon it. Also a new military genius had risen on the horizon, young, spirited, and capable, and into his hands the coming campaign was already entrusted. James Wolfe was on the eve of sailing for the St. Lawrence.

It was not Wolfe's first visit to Canada. The treaty of Aix-la-Chapelle having been broken, the summer of 1758 had seen the fortress of Louisbourg once more invested by a strong force under Amherst and Wolfe, with a well-equipped fleet in conjunction, and attacked both by land and sea the defence had proved no less spirited than on the first occasion. Unable to sustain their part any longer, the garrison had thrown down their arms with tears of mortification, and been sent prisoners to England. It was now seventy years since the first attacks on Albany, Salmon Falls, and elsewhere, devised and carried out from Canada, had occurred, and the British Ministry was determined to end the long and demoralising war.

James Wolfe belonged to a military family. His father, Major-General Wolfe, had won some distinction in Europe, and an uncle was also known in the service. The future hero and his only brother, as children, had imbibed everything military with avidity, dreaming but of wars and


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