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74   TICONDEROGA

that day, and what with the jagged standing stumps of all heights, and the inextricable confusion of the prostrate trunks lying over a space a musket shot in every direction from the works, the ground is said to have resembled the result of a tropic hurricane.

The barricade itself was over eight feet high, and had plentiful loopholes cut through the logs in two or three tiers, so that those behind it were completely under cover. Nothing but artillery could have scattered such a contrivance, and the British had nothing in view but the sweeping fire of musketry and the bayonet. During the day Montcalm had been reinforced, though not as he expected. Three hundred French regulars under Captain Pouchot opportunely arrived, to be followed the next morning by de Levis with one hundred more. This addition brought the force up to three thousand six hundred. Both officers were astonished at the amount of work accomplished and its threatening character. To an attack of anything but cannon they believed it would prove impregnable.

Towards noon the British and colonial forces began to emerge from the forest, and the assault, at first uneven, became more regular as they advanced. The breastwork they could see and


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