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TICONDEROGA   73

noon of the 8th when they came in sight of the enemy.

In the meantime Montcalm had made up his mind what to do. Unaware of the fierce if short engagement that was taking place a few miles away, towards evening of the 6th the general had broken up camp at the saw-mill, and retired to a position about two-thirds of a mile from Fort Ticonderoga, where the troops under Berry had been engaged during the day in building a barricade of logs on the somewhat elevated land. Montcalm's eye at once seized the advantage of the ridge, a section covered with a dense growth of trees, and in-spired a method. Whether in the streets of old Paris or in the wild woods of America the breastwork was always a favourite French form, and the following daybreak saw the whole force thrown into the work of strengthening the one already begun. In their shirt-sleeves, officers and men alike plied their axes with desperate haste all through the sultry July day, some felling, some trimming away the branches to add to the length and height of the wall, some merely cutting off the tops and leaving them as they fell all over the sloping ground. Thousands of trees were cut down

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