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72   TICONDEROGA

as it were, of spirit, an evil omen for the expedition. "In Lord Howe," wrote an officer present, " the soul of General Abercromby's army seemed to expire. From the unhappy moment the general was deprived of his advice, neither order nor discipline was observed, and a strange kind of infatuation usurped the place of resolution." Fortunately such language as this, while it does honour to the honest grief of mankind, is generally exaggerated, or at best applies to the immediate future of such an event. That the terribly unexpected death of his right - hand man may have somewhat bewildered the judgment of Abercromby is possible, but the fact remains that the force was advancing without artillery with the approbation of Lord Howe. They were walking straight into the lion's jaws without being aware of it, and the want of heavy guns was the real cause of the later extraordinary ill-fortune of the brigade. Not disorganisation, and certainly not want of valour !

All night of the 6th of July the men were kept under arms, and the next morning, nothing having transpired, sent back to the landing-place, weary and dispirited, to march forward again after a much-needed rest. It was about


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