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TICONDEROGA   6g

eve, however, of the advance to meet the French, Inverawe, filled with a gloomy presentiment he could not control, wandered alone in the out-skirts of the wood, and there, with the gaping wound in its breast, met face to face the restless spirit of his unavenged relative. With forced calmness, the fact was communicated to his brother-officers, and the words, "You have deceived me! This is Ticonderoga. I shall die to-morrow!" were never forgotten by those who thus knew the absorbing circumstances.

To persons familiar with the country and the winding character of the river connecting Lakes George and Champlain, the landing-place of the army shows that the rapids and falls would permit boats to go no farther. Most of the long day and night were spent in transit, and towards noon on the 6th of July, they disembarked at the head of the rapids, leaving a long arduous march for the troops in order to reach the entrenchments of the enemy.

The ground to be traversed on the left of the river was fairly level, with hills to the west, and all covered with compact primeval forest, full of briers, underbrush, and fallen mossy tree trunks, that made the route not only difficult but extremely confusing. Through this dense


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