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68   TICONDEROGA

them back to their loyalty, as well as improving their standing with the King and the Government, they hit upon an expedient. It was nothing less than to raise a regiment from among the late disaffected clans, and having clad and accoutred them in the old familiar but now prohibited national garb, to employ them in re-storing order among the still turbulent Highlanders. This was done, and Campbell of Inverawe, joining as a junior officer, rose to the rank of major. It had been definitely arranged with the Government, in raising the regiment, that it was for home duty alone; but on the long continuance of the war in America, the Black Watch was at length despatched thither in command of its major. The strange fact in connection with their commanding officer was known and believed in by the generality of the regiment, and it was therefore learned by them with dismay, on reaching Abercromby's camp, that the French headquarters, a few miles off, though frequently called Carillon, was known in the Indian dialect as Fort Ticonderoga. In referring to the position, with intuitive good feeling, his friends insisted on using the name Carillon to the laird, and for a short time he was kept in ignorance of the truth. On the


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