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TICONDEROGA   63

in years, but proud and confident in gallant hopes for the future. Among them were men who had seen the last stand of their country-men among the hills and glens for their dearly loved prince, the determined but tragic effort to restore to the throne of their fathers the brilliant but not too scrupulous Stuarts. They had seen their leaders killed in battle, beheaded, deprived of property, scattered, and themselves with ruined homes and living under a heartbreaking surveillance; but, instead of encouraging bitter feelings and in turmoil hastening their own destruction, the loyal-hearted Highlands of Scotland had accepted their disappointment and punishment with sound common-sense. The Highland regiment happily christened the Black Watch, with its proud motto " Cuideachadh an Righ," or " Help the King," was already on the honour roll of the sovereign.

At their head on this occasion stood Camp-bell of Inverawe, Major, with his young son by his side. It was with no keen feeling of anticipation for the approaching battle, however, that the bright day saw him moving through scenery that compared favourably with his own beloved lochs and mountains. A gloomy foreboding of death that for some time had fettered his


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