Previous Index Next

 

6o   TICONDEROGA

round the now historic environs of Lake Champ-lain. Here, it was felt, would occur the coming great struggle for supremacy between the powers, though Lord Loudon had predicted Quebec as the centre from which to paralyze and over-throw the ambition of France.

With this great end in view, the colonies in 1758 met a demand from William Pitt for twenty thousand men, about five times as many as ever before. These they were to raise, clothe, and pay, while the King, George II., would supply arms, ammunition, provisions, and other necessaries. In answer to this, Massachusetts alone, in desperate anxiety for her own future, raised seven thousand men especially for the command of Abercromby, and in the middle of June, these, with British troops amounting in all to fifteen thousand, were gathered near the upper end of Lake George, a great spread of white tents with artillery and stores complete.

Montcalm, with forces less than a quarter in number, lay a few miles off at Fort Carillon, or Ticonderoga, an old point of dispute throughout the border warfare. The expressed intention of de Vaudreuil, governor of Canada, had been to send a considerable detachment of Canadians and Indians, under de Levis and other famous


Previous Index Next