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TICONDEROGA   59

off to become the slaves of the savages, and sometimes, where protection could not be afforded them by the colonial governments, the terrified settlers abandoned whole districts and fled to shelter. The constant levies of militia in the different colonies, the continual increase of already too high taxes, and the presence of British troops at many points, added to the quarrels, jealousies, and dissatisfaction manifested on every hand, may not unnaturally have caused some of the reverses so much to be deplored.

No one portion of the country can be said to have been the headquarters of troops, for they were everywhere, frequently on the march from one point to another, through immense stretches of country wild and rough beyond description, without roads, covered with primeval forest, morasses through which it was almost impossible to force a way, and intersected by streams of unknown depth and perilous character.

The disastrous experiences of British arms in 1757 on the northern frontier of New York, the loss of Fort William Henry and the butchery of the unhappy defenders by the Indians, apparently escaped from the control of their Canadian allies, had concentrated attention


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