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56 THE SIEGE OF LOUISBOURG

individual, and carried out by a heterogeneous party little better than adventurers, the scheme seemed to lack almost everything necessary for success. Recruited from anywhere over three or four of the New England colonies, the force, according to a sarcastic writer of the time, "had a lawyer for contriver, a merchant for general, and farmers, fishermen, and mechanics for soldiers." All things considered, much of its success was owing to the personal force of the commanding officer. General Pepperel from the beginning showed himself a leader of men, taking more than his share of the consequences, and frequently exercising tact and forbearance when sorely tried; while the troops, in their turn, proved once more that the Anglo-Saxon blood in their veins was as full of fire as ever before. In this way the madcap adventure was brought to a successful issue, to the vast satisfaction of the victors and the lasting surprise of the reader of history.

NOTE.—The extraordinary nature of this siege is ably explained by the Abbe Raynal, in his " Philosophical and Political History of the British Settlements in North America," translated into English in 1776. The writer briefly outlines the condition of affairs previous to 1745 at Louisbourg. The fort, with its garrison of 600, and the little town of Boo in-habitants, mainly occupied themselves in the work of construc-


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