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THE SIEGE OF LOUISBOURG 49

 

 

discomfited French pulled back to Louisbourg. A few minutes later found Pomeroy, the Boston gunsmith, who thirty years later was active in turning his weapons against the British at Bunker Hill, with his apprentice assistants from the ranks, each astride of a gun, doggedly drilling out new touch-holes, and by the next day several of them were ready to be used against their quondam owners.

In the meantime, the encampment of the troops and the placing of several batteries were being pushed forward as rapidly as possible. Having neither horses nor oxen, no way remained but for the men to move the guns by sheer strength of numbers from the place of landing. The nature of the ground to be crossed proved almost impassable, including bog and spongy moss, a stretch without cover of any kind, and for nearly two miles directly in front of the ramparts. It was the only way to reach the heights above the town, and the difficulty of the feat was in-credible. Two hundred and even three hundred men were sometimes harnessed to one gun, which in spite of their efforts sometimes foundered in the marshy mire ; and to add to the hardship the work had to be accomplished at night or during thick fog, otherwise the workers

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