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48 THE SIEGE OF LOUISBOURG

struck, remained. It was complete in every respect, with several mortars in their places, and the black muzzles of forty-two-pounders, thirty in number, grinning from their embrasures over the water, with smaller guns raking backward over the woods. These had been hastily spiked, it is true, but were other-wise in perfect condition ; and quantities of cartridges, bombshells, and other invaluable stores on every hand confirmed the astonishing luck of their first adventure. As General Wolcott's report afterwards stated, "two hundred men might have held the battery against five thousand without cannon."

But no time was to be lost. A hurried note was despatched to headquarters, asking for instant assistance, and, even as they waited, four boats crowded with men were seen approaching from the fort, with the evident intention of re-occupying their position. But their courage had returned too late. With resolute hearts and unflinching demeanour, Vaughan and his thirteen men took up a place on the open beach, exposed as they were to fire from the Dauphin bastion and the island as well as their nearer assailants, and with coolness and pluck held their own until relieved, when the


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