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THE SIEGE OF LOUISBOURG 47

and, followed by every eye, he stealthily advanced towards the postern, prepared to fly with all the agility of his race should he find himself entrapped. Close and closer to the walls he drew, listening intently, and a brown hand was noiselessly extended towards the gate. The strain upon the onlookers was intense. With a slight movement the heavy door swung back-ward, and a hasty glance into the interior was followed by a jubilant attempt at a war-whoop, which brought the watchers dashing over the ridge and down the slope. A hurried survey revealed the astonishing condition of affairs. Within reigned disorder and confusion. Clothing, arms, and overturned furniture thrown about in every direction showed too evident proof of panic and hasty evacuation. In a state of bewilderment the men roamed from room to room, until Tufts, a lad of eighteen, gallantly climbed the flag-pole, and holding his red coat in his teeth fastened it to the top in lieu of a flag. His action called forth a ringing cheer from his comrades, and, at the same time, a lively volley from the Citadel, which caused him to drop with-out loss of time to safer quarters.

The emphatic and surprising fact that the place was their own without a blow being


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