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46 THE SIEGE OF LOUISBOURG

cerned, adding noticeably to the keenness of the atmosphere.

Scarcely had the irrepressible Vaughan landed, when he secured command of a number of men, and proceeded without ceremony to reconnoitre the surrounding country. With characteristic freedom he first made his way to a hill over-looking the town, which he and his company saluted with three rousing cheers, to the amazement of the garrison, who had never seen such an undisciplined mob before. Vaughan's next achievement was to round the inner side of the harbour in search of the French storehouses, and for this purpose he made a detour into the bush, in order to keep out of range of the Grand Battery situated on the water's edge. In this he was successful. No attempt was made to bar his progress, and shortly after-wards dense volumes of smoke and flame rolling skywards, proclaimed the destruction of extensive warehouses full of naval supplies.

In the morning, as the silence remained unbroken, Vaughan and a picked patrol returning, cautiously stole nearer to the walls, when, to their unbounded surprise, they perceived no sign of life about the place. A Cape Cod Indian present was induced to make a closer survey,


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