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DOLLARD DES ORMEAUX   q

who had spent the winter on the Upper Ottawa, could not be relied on. It was better to strike without delay.

Meanwhile forty Huron Indians, the flower of the tribe, and a few Algonquins, who had been living for some time under the eye of the Quebec fortress, had gathered for the same purpose, and hearing of Dollard's intended departure, rapidly paddled up the current and joined forces, hoping soon to surprise the foe. In high spirits they proceeded, mostly at night, to avoid the lynx eye of any prowling brave, paying little heed to the penetrating cold, and making light of encounters with floating ice. Where rapids must be avoided they portaged, pushing and carrying their boats over rough ice and stones, and sometimes leaping into the intensely cold water to push them off. Never was known a forlorn hope more confident or devoted. Prayers, simple and soldier-like, were held night and morning, each addressing God in his own tongue, French, Huron, or Algonquin, and every one absolutely sure that he was receiving power to achieve from that source alone.

Following the shore beside the Lachine rapids, they took to the water again, and paddled swiftly up Lake St. Louis, soon to arrive at the western end of Montreal, where the great brown volume


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